Protect your property from flooding  

Protect your property from flooding

Before a flood

Link to “Insure your property for your flood hazard”

Safeguard your possessions.
Create a personal flood file containing information about all your possessions and keep it in a secure place, such as a safe deposit box or waterproof container. This file should have:

  • A copy of your insurance policies with your agents contact information.
  • A household inventory: For insurance purposes, be sure to keep a written and visual (i.e., videotaped or photographed) record of all major household items and valuables, even those stored in basements, attics or garages. Create files that include serial numbers and store receipts for major appliances and electronics. Have jewelry and artwork appraised. These documents are critically important when filing insurance claims. For more information visit www.knowyourstuff.org.
  • Copies of all other critical documents, including finance records or receipts of major purchases.

Prepare your house.

  • Avoid building in a floodplain unless you elevate and reinforce your home.
  • Make sure your sump pump is working and then install a battery-operated backup, in case of a power failure. Installing a water alarm will also let you know if water is accumulating in your basement.
  • Clear debris from gutters and downspouts.
  • Anchor any fuel tanks.
  • Raise your electrical components (switches, sockets, circuit breakers, and wiring) at least 12 inches above your home's projected flood elevation.
  • Place the furnace, water heater, washer, and dryer on cement blocks at least 12 inches above the projected flood elevation.
  • Move furniture, valuables, and important documents to a safe place.
  • Consider installing "check valves" to prevent flood water from backing up into the drains of your home.
  • If feasible, construct barriers to stop floodwater from entering the building and seal walls in basements with waterproofing compounds.

 After a flood

Cleaning Up and Repairing Your Home

  • Turn off the electricity at the main breaker or fuse box, even if the power is off in your community. That way, you can decide when your home is dry enough to turn it back on.
  • Keep power off until an electrician has inspected your system for safety.
  • Prevent mold by removing wet contents immediately.
  • Get a copy of the book "Repairing Your Flooded Home" (link m4540081_repairingFloodedHome.pdf) which is available free from the American Red Cross or your state or local emergency manager. It will tell you:
    • How to enter your home safely.
    • How to protect your home and belongings from further damage.
    • How to record damage to support insurance claims and requests for assistance.
    • How to check for gas or water leaks and how to have service restored.
    • How to clean up appliances, furniture, floors and other belongs.
    • The Red Cross can provide you with a cleanup kit: mop, broom, bucket, and cleaning supplies.
    • Contact your insurance agent to discuss claims.
    • Listen to your radio for information on assistance that may be provided by the state or federal government or other organizations.
    • If you hire cleanup or repair contractors, check references and be sure they are qualified to do the job. Be wary of people who drive through neighborhoods offering help in cleaning up or repairing your home.
    • Take photos of any floodwater in your home and save any damaged personal property.
    • Make a list of damaged or lost items and include their purchase date and value with receipts, and place with the inventory you took prior to the flood. Some damaged items may require disposal, so keep photographs of these items.

For more information, visit https://www.floodsmart.gov/floodsmart/pages/preparation_recovery/pr_overview.jsp